The art of Piero Golia

Piero Golia (b. Napoli 1974) lives in Los Angeles.

His works (sculptures, installations, performances), with a provocative neodada flavor, aim at subverting the rules, arousing astonishment, and exploring numerous mise-en-scènes.


Constantly on the line between superman hood and self irony, his audacious ventures underline the paradoxes of contemporary society: in 2001, when invited to participate to the Tirana Biennial, Golia reaches the Albanian coast with a canoe, traveling backwards along the same route followed by emigrants (Going to Tirana); in 2005 he disappears from New York, travels across the United States to arrive at the Royal Academy of Arts in Copenhagen.

Constantly on the line between superman hood and self irony, his audacious ventures underline the paradoxes of contemporary society.

In 2003 he presents It takes a nation of millions to hold us back at the Cosmic gallery in Paris: an entire facade removed from a building in Amsterdam and laid down on one side. Two million dollars (2006) consists of one million dollars taken from a bank just to be photographed.

Golia has also directed the film Killer shrimps, presented at the 2004 Venice Biennale.
Golia's works have been exhibited in the most prestigious institutions dedicated to contemporary art: the Serpentine Gallery, London (2006); PS1, New York (2006); Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2007); MOCA, Los Angeles (2010); MAXXI, Rome (2010); Fondation d’Entreprise Ricard, Paris (2012); the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2014). Amongst his solo exhibitions are Loser, Statements, Art Basel Miami (2003); Double Tumble or the Awesome Twins, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2011); Chalet Hollywood, Los Angeles (2013–14); Chalet Dallas, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas (2015–16); the French Academy at Villa Medici, Rome (2016) and Piero Golia. The Painter, Kunsthaus Baselland, Basel (2017).
He has also participated to the Moscow Biennial (2007) and to the 55th Venice Biennale (2013).

Opening photo: Untitled(My Gold is Yours), 2013
Gold and concrete
Venice Biennale installation
Courtesy of the artist e Gagosian Gallery